Social Media

Opinion _ ‘Elon Musk Is Doing for Zuckerberg What Trump Did for George W. Bush’

This transcript was created utilizing speech recognition software program. Whereas it has been reviewed by human transcribers, it could comprise errors. Please evaluate the episode audio earlier than quoting from this transcript and e-mail transcripts@nytimes.com with any questions.

michelle cottle

I hold getting these bizarre advertisements on Twitter. Like, it’s all masculinity influencers pumping iron, and a few relationship website that allows you to discover sugar daddies? What’s — am I the one one?

carlos lozada

They figured you out, Michelle.

michelle cottle

Let’s be clear. I’ve been married for since God was a boy. I’ve not accomplished something to deserve sugar daddy relationship advertisements. And I’m undecided that I’m ready for the Threads model of this. I’m simply not. [MUSIC PLAYING] From New York Instances Opinion, I’m Michelle Cottle.

carlos lozada

I’m Carlos Lozada.

lydia polgreen

I’m Lydia Polgreen, and that is “Matter of Opinion.” So Ross is out this week on a well-deserved trip, however we’re going to speak concerning the trials and tribulations of social media — particularly, there’s been so much happening with Twitter, which is a social community that’s beloved by journalists and politicians, however much less so by different folks. And now, there’s an enormous new competitor to Twitter and it’s known as Threads. It was created by the corporate Meta, which is the most important social media firm on this planet — well-known for platforms like Fb and Instagram, in addition to the messaging platform, WhatsApp. And this app, Threads, appears to be giving Twitter an actual run for its cash. So I assumed this was an incredible probability to speak about what’s taking place, how is social media altering and what do we would like from it at present. So initially, are you guys on Threads?

michelle cottle

Be trustworthy, Carlos.

carlos lozada

Properly, I can be, however this may simply emphasize the battle I really feel. So I’ve been lively on Twitter for a very long time. And after I noticed everybody posting their like, I’ve joined Threads on Twitter, I made a decision that I ought to do the identical. However right here’s what occurred. I didn’t know you needed to have an Instagram account to hitch Threads, and I’ve not been lively on Instagram. And so I needed to determine Instagram out first, after which I needed to be a part of Threads. And rapidly, I’m checking Threads, I’m checking Twitter, I’m determining Instagram. And I simply stopped and I mentioned, what am I doing with my life? Like, why am I spending time this fashion? So really, I discovered — which is not any imply feat — the best way to delete my new Instagram, the best way to delete Threads. I’m not — I’m not making an enormous assertion about how I’m leaving social media ceaselessly, however we’ve gone down this path earlier than with Twitter. I don’t know why 100 million plus or regardless of the quantity is now that individuals who have joined Threads in some way really feel that it’s going to be completely different and higher this time. And perhaps as an alternative of leaping onto a brand new community, we will use the decline of Twitter as an opportunity to only rethink whether or not that is how we wish to dwell our lives.

michelle cottle

Oh, my God, you need folks to be reflective and considerate, Carlos. That’s so cute. I adore it.

lydia polgreen

So cute.

michelle cottle

I’ve been grudgingly passive on Twitter. I have a tendency to hitch issues for work functions, to comply with politicians, to comply with different journalists and to remark as little as humanly potential, as a result of it’s my place that Twitter America is the worst America — besides with the potential of Fb America. So I’m like, good riddance.

lydia polgreen

Properly, I imply, look. I perceive why each of you are feeling that method. Nonetheless, I’ve been a Twitter evangelist for a really very long time. I keep in mind after I bought my first Twitter account, I used to be a younger international correspondent working in West Africa, and I assumed, oh, my gosh, that is so thrilling. And I believe lots of people have a look at what has occurred with social media they usually’re like, cesspool, rubbish fireplace, dumpster fireplace, that is all actually, actually horrible. And I believe it’s salutary to assume again to what the world was like earlier than social media, when folks couldn’t actually discuss to one another throughout huge distances and also you couldn’t have these sorts of globe-spanning conversations. And for me as a younger international correspondent, the promise of it was, hey, this is a chance that quite than having a one-way, I’m going to publish tales in The New York Instances about what’s happening in Senegal or what’s happening in Congo or Nigeria, and people folks can perhaps write a letter to an editor or an e-mail to me. However now we now have this chance to have a public dialog about it. And that to me felt so thrilling and so intoxicating. And naturally, then comes the Arab Spring and this concept that social media can actually be a pressure for social change and everyone was so excited and optimistic, and I used to be definitely excited and optimistic. After which it bought actually dangerous and actually ugly as a result of I believe everybody realized that this isn’t a impartial phenomenon, proper? Like these instruments of group and of change can be utilized by, actually anybody whowants to make change occur. And when it was folks advocating for democracy and towards the autocratic rulers of the Center East, that was one factor. However when it’s abruptly, you understand, neo-Nazis in Charlottesville, Virginia, it begins to look very, very completely different. And so I’ve been on this full journey with social media. And I simply can’t fairly give up it, that spark of optimism. So I’m on Threads. I’ve additionally on Bluesky, which is one other app that was created —

carlos lozada

Oh, is that what it’s known as?

michelle cottle

Yeah.

carlos lozada

I’d all the time simply seen it when folks like, written it, and I assumed it was like, Blueski, like brewski. Nobody had ever mentioned it out loud to me earlier than. Bluesky makes much more sense. OK, yeah.

lydia polgreen

And so just like the kind of particular person publish, the like slangy identify for it’s a skeet, which I believe is fairly humorous.

carlos lozada

OK. Properly then Blueski makes extra sense.

lydia polgreen

Brewskis on Blueski.

michelle cottle

We’re having a ski.

lydia polgreen

Yeah. However, so I actually get this thirst that individuals have to attach on this explicit method.

michelle cottle

Yeah, I can completely see how one can get the sense of group otherwise you discover individuals who share your explicit area of interest pastime or attraction to one thing. However on steadiness, what we’re winding up with is folks need consideration. And the best way you get consideration on Twitter is you change into the most important jerk within the room, and that’s form of what Twitter now feeds. And particularly since Musk has taken over, there’s simply no — there’s not even a pretense that you simply’re attempting to maintain it from being overrun by, say, neo-Nazis or no matter. I imply, it’s simply a kind of issues. Finally these pretty, convey us collectively Democratic instruments change into hostage to disinformation and folk operating amok alongside these traces.

lydia polgreen

Yeah, I imply, however the factor that made Twitter actually particular — and I assume I shouldn’t discuss it previously tense. It nonetheless exists. And who is aware of, Elon Musk, the wonderful and erratic entrepreneur might but flip issues round. However the factor that’s actually completely different about Twitter from all the different social networks, all of which are literally a lot larger than Twitter, is that on Fb, you publish one thing, after which beneath that publish there are feedback. On Instagram, you publish one thing, and beneath that publish there are feedback. However Twitter really elevates the reply to one thing that you simply publish to the identical standing as your publish. So it’s really conversational quite than, right here’s an artifact after which a bunch of individuals’s unrelated feedback about it. It’s rather more form of a dialogue. And I believe that’s what actually lies on the coronary heart of the enchantment. And I believe that there’s this human want for dialogue, like this fashion during which all of us wish to attain out and discuss to one another. And I believe that that, in some methods, kind of explains why Threads, this new app from Meta, has taken off. I believe that all of us need to have the ability to have these sorts of conversations. We would not wish to have them in precisely the best way that they had been taking place on Twitter, however I believe that that want to attach and that want to change concepts and to speak is a really, very human want. It’s simply that all through historical past, it has been restricted, technologically, to the people who find themselves near us, or to at least one to at least one communication quite than one to many.

carlos lozada

I believe we discuss so much concerning the want to attach, and I believe that’s actual. Nevertheless it’s additionally a want for validation, and approval, and recognition. I imply, journalists and politicians are kind of like, exquisitely conditioned to reply to alerts of exterior approval. For journalists, it’s like, folks studying our tales, listening to our podcast, what number of downloads, proper? For politicians, it’s getting votes, it’s elevating cash, it’s seeing plenty of crowds at your rallies. So to have a community you could entry in your cellphone or your laptop computer or no matter that immediately quantifies how a lot folks such as you, just like the one factor you mentioned, how many individuals comply with you, it’s completely made for these sorts of individuals. Consider these phrases: likes, follows. They’re very political in a way. And so I believe sure, the connection half has been actual for me and that’s nice and I’ve genuinely made these connections. But in addition, it’s about that prompt gratification of feeling that that factor I mentioned was good or intelligent. So sure, it’s group, but in addition, it’s one thing extra narcissistic than that, I believe.

lydia polgreen

It’s fascinating although, to assume somewhat bit concerning the variations between these platforms. I talked about Twitter as being a spot the place you publish and reply and them having equal weight. The quickest rising social media platforms I believe are a lot much less interactive in that sense, and rather more algorithmic. I imply, one of many issues that made Twitter actually completely different along with the replies having the identical standing as the unique publish is that you could possibly pressure the app to indicate you afeed that’s simply of your selecting. So I might comply with the people who I’m focused on, and the one issues that I might see in my feed are these issues — and a few commercials, however there are fewer and fewer commercials on Twitter as of late. And so a key distinction between Threads and Twitter is that Threads strikes fully within the path of algorithmic curation. And I appear to be the one one who’s actually actively enjoying round on it. Nevertheless it’s tremendous fascinating, as a result of it’s constructed on the again of Instagram. It’s all the people who I comply with on Instagram, which are usually like a lot much less about politics and rather more artwork and leisure, and I comply with plenty of meals and restaurant issues. And so the feed that I’m getting ate up Threads seems to be very, very completely different from my Instagram feed.

carlos lozada

Sorry, it’s completely different from Instagram or completely different from Twitter?

lydia polgreen

I’m sorry, it’s completely different from Twitter. As a result of Twitter is like, these are the accounts that I comply with and that I actually am focused on.

carlos lozada

However I don’t know — ought to we belief Zuckerberg greater than we belief Musk?

lydia polgreen

No!

carlos lozada

I simply love how everyone seems to be like dashing into the arms — you understand like, oh, Elon Musk is horrible, let’s put our religion in Mark Zuckerberg. You recognize, Elon Musk is doing for Zuckerberg what Trump did for George W. Bush —

michelle cottle

Thanks.

carlos lozada

Make him look actually good in hindsight. You recognize like, hey, perhaps that’s higher. Perhaps that was actually nice in any case. Keep in mind how a lot we liked Fb after we didn’t.

michelle cottle

Oh, my God, we’re buying and selling in a single tech boy manchild for one more once more, and Zuckerberg is not any higher. I imply, granted, he has not challenged Musk for a literal penis measuring contest, which is —

lydia polgreen

Hey, hey, hey, we’re a household podcast. We’re a household podcast.

michelle cottle

It was dangerous sufficient after they had been doing their, we’re going to cage match. However now Musk is like, actually able to measure his deal with towards Zuckerberg. And solely that form of nonsense might make Zuckerberg seem like a sympathetic determine.

carlos lozada

Logan Roy did say that typically that’s the competitors.

lydia polgreen

OK, associates. Let’s take a fast break. And after we come again, I wish to discuss the way forward for social media and whether or not there’s any hope that it’s going to be any higher than the previous. [MUSIC PLAYING] And we’re again. So we’ve talked concerning the saga of Twitter, and now I wish to flip to the broader social media panorama. Is social media actually social anymore? That time period was created, however you consider one thing like TikTok, and what’s fascinating is I’m really not an enormous TikTok consumer. The best way that I primarily use TikTok is that individuals in my group chats, which I might say is definitely now my major social community, are group chats, get despatched to me and I watch them and assume they’re humorous after which I ship them on to different folks on different group chats. So I don’t know, is social media even the fitting time period?

michelle cottle

I imply, I like the TikTok movies of the fellows in Appalachia doing their comedy routines. My associates and I do the identical factor with the group chats. They ship me movies of like, folks doing little mini skits, and I like these. These are enjoyable, nevertheless it’s not like me chatting with the man in Appalachian who’s doing it.

carlos lozada

Social media may be very benign as an idea. It seems like, why would you be towards it? It’s social. It’s folks getting collectively. And I don’t know what else to name it. The time period has the primary mover benefit. Nevertheless it appears excessively type to what the worst examples of it have change into, and it appears excessively imprecise for the range that exists, simply what you all have simply described.

lydia polgreen

Yeah. I don’t essentially discover social media to be particularly social as of late. And in some methods, the socialness of it’s largely undesirable, so. Perhaps we might all begin socializing in ever smaller, smaller teams. However is there a path to a greater model of social media?

michelle cottle

I imply, this stuff are all the time on steadiness, proper? Like, I did love the thought of Twitter as being a information supply for issues taking place in remote locations the place folks didn’t have plenty of entry to common, mainstream media sources. Nevertheless it’s all the time going to be one among this stuff that wants somewhat little bit of oversight or somewhat little bit of curation, and the American authorities particularly doesn’t appear to have any form of sense of this. The market’s not going to deal with it. I imply, you may have the Fb algorithms, which aren’t simply selling connection, they’re pushing up essentially the most excessive, most violence-inducing, nastiest stuff potential. So with issues like that happening, I don’t have plenty of hope that we’re in a position to get our arms round this. So we’re simply letting it run wild.

lydia polgreen

Properly, I imply, we’re however we aren’t. I imply, I believe that we’re seeing a bunch of makes an attempt to control thisspace. And it was that there was plenty of exercise by way of antitrust or makes an attempt to do rules round privateness, after which makes an attempt to do rules round disinformation and misinformation. However I believe there’s been a very fascinating transfer that you simply’re seeing extra on the conservative aspect of American politics to limit entry to social media for younger folks, round psychological well being and different points like that. So I believe there’s really been, from a bunch of various locations, plenty of ferment and exercise to try to pivot social media into a unique path or to limit entry to it altogether.

michelle cottle

Though with one thing like that, I are likely to assume that as a society, one thing that we all know we will’t probably regulate or get our arms round in toto, we are likely to concentrate on youngsters. So we’re not going to let youngsters do that. We’re not going to let youngsters do this. For me, that’s only a sign that we’ve given up for the broader functions.

carlos lozada

Regulation can also be form of antithetical to the unique ethos of what this was purported to be. Do you do not forget that actually tremendous melodramatic Declaration of the Independence of Our on-line world that got here out from the Digital Frontier Basis within the 90s? I regarded it up, and it was — right here’s the way it started. It was like, governments of the Industrial world, you weary giants of flesh and metal, I come from our on-line world, the brand new dwelling of thoughts. On behalf of the long run, I ask you of the previous to depart us alone. You’re not welcome amongst us. I imply, and it mentioned that our on-line world was growing its personal social contract. It will be ruled solely by, get this, the Golden Rule. So the federal government might simply again off on regulation. We all the time dream that new applied sciences will save us, after which we dream that they’ll destroy us after they form of perform a little of each.

michelle cottle

And you may complain about gatekeepers infinitely, however I do assume that there’s a actual difficulty as we deal, in a brand new technology of AI and disinformation, when there aren’t any gatekeepers by way of who’s out within the public sq., like rallying people round these things. And we simply noticed this court docket case the place the Biden administration has been ordered to not contact social media corporations about stuff. And that could be a hurdle to getting them to cope with disinformation. So like, COVID disinformation, issues like this. And you may all the time take it too far. However what you’re is growing technique of speaking stuff that’s simply completely not true, damaging, violence-promoting, let’s all go storm the Capitol. Concurrently you’re simply form of throwing up your arms and being like, oh effectively, we’ll simply must let that go. There’s nothing to be accomplished about it.

lydia polgreen

Properly, expertise has all the time modified the best way that we communicated. You recognize, I take into consideration the function of Radio Mille Collines within the Rwandan genocide as a spot the place they drummed up help and bought folks to exit and homicide their neighbors. That’s the identical factor that occurred on Fb in locations like Myanmar. So in some methods, that is an outdated story and a brand new story. However we’re going into a very fascinating time the place social media, I believe, goes to be an enormous issue, that means the 2024 presidential election.

michelle cottle

Attention-grabbing is one phrase for it.

lydia polgreen

Sure, fascinating, perhaps terrifying is a greater phrase. So one of many issues that I’ve been desirous about and I’m curious what you guys take into consideration that is, what does it imply for our politics, and for 2024, that we’re going to be , presumably, a way more fragmented social media panorama, significantly round journalism and politics.

carlos lozada

I believe it’s nice. I’m all on board with the fragmentation of that phantasm of the general public sq. that Twitter gave us. It was identical to, speaking to ourselves, but whereas considering you had been speaking to everybody. Nothing I hated greater than when somebody on Twitter would say, hey, learn the room. You recognize, like, effectively, we’re in numerous rooms. We’re not even in the identical home typically, so like, shut up. I don’t assume that was wholesome. I believe some fragmentation of that’s wholesome.

michelle cottle

I’ll take the extra contrarian view, which is that the fragmentation of the media panorama and letting folks sit inside their echo chambers has been an issue up till this level, and I don’t foresee it getting a lot better. And it additionally, once more — and I do know that is like my obsession. We now have not discovered in any respect the best way to cope with misinformation. It’s nearly unimaginable to inform the fakes aside anymore. You’ll be able to put Ron DeSantis’ head on whoever you need. You can also make folks say no matter you need. And when you’re policing one or two main websites, that’s one factor. However you’re going to be policing dozens of those websites. And I believe what will must occur is you’re going to must go downstream and begin educating folks the best way to cope with misinformation earlier than they’re ever on these websites.

carlos lozada

I belief fragmentation greater than I belief monopolization, although.

lydia polgreen

That’s what I used to be going to only say is like, to me, what you’re describing really sounds much more of what the paranoid, conspiratorial panorama regarded like pre-social media. I imply, you had radio applications. There have been all of those conspiracy concept newsletters, like actually letters that may arrive in your mail. However they had been all I believe segmented towards each other. You’d have the right-wing conspiracy theories and the left-wing conspiracy theorists, they usually all had their very own, quote unquote, “platforms,” whether or not it was a radio present, or some folks would file issues and ship them out on tapes. There’s an enormous and really various historical past in the USA of the methods during which conspiratorial disinformation materials strikes round. And I believe that quite than having a central clearinghouse for it the place anybody can come and go and get it, having it fragmented on numerous completely different platforms feels, to me, much more manageable, in a method that these kinds of theories have a more durable time entering into the bloodstream of the physique politic, as a result of they’re kind of caught in these cul de sacs.

michelle cottle

I don’t know. Twitter was not the first supply of the parents who determined they wished to trash the Capitol, proper?

lydia polgreen

Properly, no. However I believe what’s fascinating as effectively, and it is a factor that’s come up in plenty of the conversations that Meta executives have had about Threads. And naturally, they’re simply so thrilled with themselves at having launched the quickest rising social media app ever on this planet. I believe Threads is now as much as about 100 million customers. However I hearken to Adam Mosseri, who’s the top of Instagram, be interviewed by our colleagues on “Hardfork,” The New York Instances expertise podcast. They usually’re saying very explicitly that we don’t see this as a platform for information and for journalism and politics. And Meta, as an entire, I believe has been shifting very exhausting in a path away from information and politics, as a result of who desires the effort? It’s introduced plenty of undesirable scrutiny. In order that they’re actually leaning in — and the rationale that that is constructed off of Instagram, I believe, is as a result of they’re leaning into leisure and sports activities and influencers and wonder and people sorts of issues. And sure, journalists can be there, and sure, politicians can be there identical to they’re on Instagram and Fb now, however I believe as an organization, Meta is operating as quick and so far as it might away from information and politics.

michelle cottle

Perhaps. Though with the presidential race arising, Zuckerberg doesn’t have an incredible observe file on placing something above his cash grubbing. So I’ll stay vaguely hopeful, however I’m not going to rely on it.

carlos lozada

There was a e book like 5 years in the past known as Delinquent Media by a professor at UVA. And he mainly was arguing that if he wished to construct an environment friendly machine for spreading propaganda and lies and distrust and enabling widespread surveillance — like, you’d be exhausting pressed to do higher than creating Fb, and the trendy social media networks. I believe we’re caught with it, although. You recognize, they fail, however then a brand new one comes alongside. Like keep in mind Friendster? Considered one of my favourite moments was in 2009, there was a e book that got here out known as Stealing Myspace, The Battle to Management the Most Fashionable Web site in America was the subtitle. And it was revealed simply as the location was cratering, and Twitter and Fb had been turning into dominant. So it’s exhausting — like I began off saying that I logged onto Threads after which instantly deleted my account as a result of I bought all these qualms. Nevertheless it’s exhausting to think about our giving up solely on these digital prompt gratification machines that reward us for pomposity and recognition.

michelle cottle

There’s no method it’s going away. I imply, when you’ve launched one thing like this, it’s going to spiral, and the most effective you could hope for is that every iteration learns one thing from the earlier one. I see no signal that we’re doing that proper now, however that’s the most effective you possibly can hope for.

lydia polgreen

Properly, on that bleak observe, Michelle, thanks. All I do know is, I’m actually, actually pleased to have this little social community right here to speak about these questions. All proper, effectively, let’s go away it there. After we come again, cold and hot. [MUSIC PLAYING] OK, people. And at last, it’s time for decent chilly, the place each week, one among us shares one thing that we’re into, over, or someplace in between. So who’s bought the recent chilly this week?

carlos lozada

I’m hot-colding at present.

lydia polgreen

Yay.

carlos lozada

It’s not one thing I’m solely chilly on — or maybe one thing I ought to be chilly on however I’m not.

michelle cottle

Are you tepid? You’re tepid.

carlos lozada

I’ll must let you know a narrative first, and that’s that I spent the majority of the Nineteen Eighties in Peru, the place I’m from. And at a distance, I imbibed a bizarre, erratic mixture of American tradition — like “Knight Rider” andThe “A-Workforce” had been large for the center college set, you understand, dubbed into Spanish after all, “Knight Rider” was [SPEAKING SPANISH].. However one piece of American cultural hegemony that didn’t make it to me was “The Cosby Present.” Later I bought married. My spouse, who’s American and grew up right here instructed me how a lot she had liked the present when she was younger. And we now have three youngsters now. We devour plenty of tradition collectively. We learn books out loud at breakfast, we watch like “Nature” and “Nova” and you understand, C-SPAN. Sorry.

michelle cottle

Yeah, it’s like that in my home, too.

carlos lozada

However lately — all this to say we lately began watching “The Cosby Present.”

lydia polgreen

Ooh, controversial.

michelle cottle

Daring.

carlos lozada

Our three youngsters are actually concerning the ages that Denise and Theo and Vanessa had been when the present started. And we mentioned this with the youngsters forward of time, explaining who Invoice Cosby was as an artist and as an individual and the accusations towards him. We talked concerning the dilemmas of appreciating artwork by individuals who do horrible issues. However I believe we’re all having fun with elements of it. My youngsters, particularly the older two, are struck by the form of informal cruelty typically in the best way the Cliff Huxtable character, you understand, Cosby’s character treats the youngsters. That jogs my memory of the form of undercurrents I’ve present in his books as effectively. I received’t say I’m scorching on Invoice Cosby. I’m not sitting right here attempting to redeem him.

lydia polgreen

Oh, Carlos, you’re going to take a beat down for that.

carlos lozada

However I’m open to watching and desirous about this present and having that have as a household. And that’s my scorching chilly.

michelle cottle

I believe that’s very fascinating by way of retaking again some tradition that has been ruined by the form of private grossness of the individual concerned. I imply, you run throughout this on a regular basis. Like, do you watch Roman Polanski films? Do you watch Woody Allen films? I believe the artist versus the artwork is form of a permanent dilemma for us, and I’m fascinated by the way you’re dealing with this along with your youngsters, no much less.

carlos lozada

It’s a selective dilemma, by the best way. Like, do you do you all hearken to Michael Jackson’s music? In fact you do, as a result of Michael Jackson is so good, he’s uncancelable.

lydia polgreen

Properly, and it’s additionally like, the place do you cease? I imply, I’m an enormous fan of Janet Jackson and I noticed her in live performance a few years in the past, and she or he had this entire montage about how wonderful her brother Michael was. And I used to be like, I don’t assume he’s so great. However on the similar time, I’m not going to cease loving Janet Jackson as a result of she loves her brother. The place does it finish? How do you draw the road? I simply may also say that I liked “The Cosby Present” after I was a child. I additionally grew up outdoors of the USA and for me, it was a very essential touchstone to attempting to know not simply American tradition, but in addition what it’s to be Black in America. And I used to be somewhat stunned after I realized after I bought right here as an adolescent that it really wasn’t actually like that for many Black folks. However placing that apart.

michelle cottle

Disappointment.

lydia polgreen

Additionally, the present that I actually, actually, actually, actually liked as a result of it hit me at precisely the fitting second was “A Completely different World,” which was the sequel that was all about when Lisa Bonet went on to an HBCU —

carlos lozada

Hillman.

lydia polgreen

Hillman.

michelle cottle

I preferred that present. That was an superior present.

lydia polgreen

Once more, I assumed that’s what school was going to be like and seems that I used to be unsuitable, so.

michelle cottle

Life is stuffed with —

carlos lozada

Life just isn’t like NBC. Yeah.

lydia polgreen

Oh, effectively, I might rewatch something with you guys. Thanks a lot for an incredible dialog.

michelle cottle

Thanks.

carlos lozada

Thanks. See you subsequent week. [MUSIC PLAYING]

lydia polgreen

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